NAEL Sixteenth-Century Intro Summary

The Norton Anthology of English Literature’s introduction to the sixteenth century begins with the same question CS Lewis did in his “New Learning and New Ignorance” essay: where did the great literature from the end of the century came from? England started the century as a backward nation in the eyes of Europe, and the most famous piece of literature it produced in the century’s first forty years (Utopia) was written in Latin.

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Like Lewis, the authors seek to outline the social changes and intellectual atmosphere that encouraged writers like Spenser, Sidney, and Shakespeare to emerge. Continue reading “NAEL Sixteenth-Century Intro Summary”

NAEL Sixteenth-Century Intro Summary

ENGL 358 Secondary Sources

My Renaissance survey class will be reading, summarizing, and using this scholarship this semester.

  • Berger, Harry. “Andrew Marvell: The Poem as Green World.” Second World and Green World: Studies in Renaissance Fiction-Making. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Print.
  • –. “Prelude to Interpretation.” Revisionary Play: Studies in the Spenserian Dynamics. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Print.
  • –. “The Renaissance Imagination: Second World and Green World.” Second World and Green World: Studies in Renaissance Fiction-Making. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Print.
  • –. “Sprezzatura and the Absence of Grace.” Castiglione, Baldassarre, and Daniel Javitch. The Book of the Courtier: The Singleton Translation : an Authoritative Text Criticism. New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2002. Print.
  • Dollimore, Jonathan. Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology, and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984. Print.
  • Empson, William. Milton’s God. London: Chatto & Windus, 1965. Print.
  • Ferguson, Margaret. Trials of Desire: Renaissance Defenses of Poetry. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1983. Print.
  • Fish, Stanley E. Surprised by Sin: The Reader in “paradise Lost.”. London: Macmillan, 1967. Print.
  • Greenblatt, Stephen. Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980. Print.
  • Jankowski, Theodora A. “Defining/Confining the Duchess: Negotiating the Female Body in John Webster’s “The Duchess of Malfi”” Studies in Philology 87.2 (1990): 221-45. Web.
  • King, John N. English Reformation Literature: The Tudor Origins of the Protestant Tradition. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press, 1982. Print.
  • Lewalski, Barbara K. Protestant Poetics and the Seventeenth-Century Religious Lyric. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press, 1979. Print.
  • Lewis, C S. A Preface to Paradise Lost. London: Oxford University Press, 1961. Print.
  • Miller, David Lee. “Spenser’s Poetics: The Poem’s Two Bodies.” PMLA 101.2 (1986): 170-85. Web.
  • Shuger, Debora K. Habits of Thought in the English Renaissance: Religion, Politics, and the Dominant Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990. Print.
  • Slights, William. “The Play of Conspiracies in Volpone.” Ben Jonson’s Volpone, or the Fox. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1988. Print.
ENGL 358 Secondary Sources